Disabled-access ticket sales rise at gigs and festivals

Written by Jenny Stevens for The Guardian

Disabled-access ticket sales at gigs and festivals have increased by 70% in the last year, according to research from a charity that works to improve access to live music in the UK.

Attitude Is Everything said that across 106 venues and festivals signed up to its charter of best practice, 114,000 disabled-access tickets were sold in 2014, compared with 67,000 in 2013.

The figures cover festivals including Glastonbury, Download and Reading and Leeds plus venues such as the O2 and the Roundhouse in London and Manchester Academy.

Our cities must undergo a revolution for older people

Written by Anne Karpf for The Guardian

Stand at the traffic lights on a major street in any city. Now, when the green man invites you, try to cross the road. Unless you have the acceleration of an Olympic sprinter, the chances are that the beeps will stop, the green man will flash and cars will rev impatiently before you’ve reached the sanctuary of the other side. Especially if you have a disability, are pushing a buggy or laden with shopping. Or are old. The Department of Health says the average walking speed demanded by pedestrian crossings is 1.2 metres a second, while the average speed of the older pedestrian is just 0.7 to 0.9 metres per second.

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A brief history of UK Disability and Access Legislation

Shortly after World War II, the UK government introduced the National Assistance Act (NAA, 1948) which called for, amongst other things, the establishment of welfare services for people with disabilities (PwD); with the Attlee government asserting that ‘the guiding principle of welfare services should be to ensure that all handicapped persons, whatever their disability, should have the maximum opportunity of sharing in and contributing to the life of the community, so that their capacities are realised to the full, their self-confidence developed, and their social contacts strengthened’.

Though the NAA made significant improvements in the lives of PwD through the universal provision of healthcare and medical assistance, there was no mention of the built environment.

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Proposed new rights for people with learning disabilities – a quick guide…

Care minister Norman Lamb (see above photo) on Friday unveiled a green paper of proposals to give people with learning disabilities, autism and mental health conditions more rights around the care they receive.

No voice unheard, no right ignored is a consultation to gain the views of disabled people, their families, those working in the sector and other interested parties on the proposals. It opens on 6 March, and closes in 12 weeks’ time, on 29 May. Here are six things you need to know about the proposals.

Continue reading Proposed new rights for people with learning disabilities – a quick guide…